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Education

Study Abroad - From the world to WASEDA -

From China to Waseda

Ms. Wang Ming-jia
Intensive Japanese Language Program

Fascinated with Japanese Anime
Her Japanese intonation is very natural

Her Japanese intonation is very natural

Ms. Wang is a student in the Department of Japanese Studies of the prestigious Shanghai Jiao Tong University and currently enrolled in the Intensive Japanese Language Program at the Center for Japanese Language. While mathematics, science and engineering majors have long been popular among students in China, an increasing number of students now major in humanities and arts, she first explained to us. "Then, why did you started learning Japanese?" we asked. "While the Chinese language has a lot of strong, clear sounds, I felt comfortable listening to melodious, beautiful sounds of the Japanese language," she said before adding with a blush, "But actually, it might have been Japanese anime I often watched when I was a child." When she was a child, anime series like Detective Conan and Slam Dunk were great hits. "Now I love One Piece," she laughed.

Doing her own Cooking
Huangshan Mountain (or Yellow Mountain) in Anhui Province is like a 'shan shui' painting

Huangshan Mountain (or Yellow Mountain) in Anhui Province is like a 'shan shui' painting

Ming-jia's parents were very delighted to hear that she was enrolled at Waseda University. She said, "Waseda is well known also in China. China has this one-child policy and I am an only child. They wanted me to be more independent." In fact, she had rarely done housework before she came to Japan. But she is now doing her own cooking to reduce expenses as much as possible. She said, "First, I make a huge potful of curry," but she cannot eat it every day. Then, she spoils herself just a little and goes to a ramen restaurant. "I like Ippudo. Their ramen is unique and quite different from Chinese ramen."

Career prospects

One of the best things in her life in Japan is that she could widen her acquaintance. In the dormitory live also international students from the United States and Europe. She also enjoyed a stay at her Japanese friend's home in Wakayama and experienced the Japanese traditional New Year festival like hatsumode (the first shrine visit of the New Year). "I want to know more about Japan. So, I have to improve my Japanese skills," she said as if to feel rushed but she'll have to go back to China in July. There is not much time left. She said she has two choices about her career: entering graduate school and coming to study in Japan again or joining a China-Japan trading company in Shanghai to get a job using Japanese. Studying in Japan has broadened her perspective. What is the best way to use it? Good luck to Ming-jia!

Third-year students at the Department of Japanese Studies of Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Third-year students at the Department of Japanese Studies of Shanghai Jiao Tong University

(Offered by WASEDA WEEKLY)