早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 2014 新年号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼2014 新年号

A WASEDA Miscellany

本学外国人教員が、自らの研究のこと、趣味や興味あることなど日々の雑感を語ります。

MUEHLEISEN Victoria

A Summer of Linguistics

MUEHLEISEN Victoria
Associate Professor
Faculty of International Research and Education

In the spring semester of 2013, I had a six months sabbatical from teaching at Waseda University. I decided tospend one month of it in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to attend the Linguistic Society of America’s Summer Institutewhich being held there at the University of Michigan. Every other year, the Institute convenes at a differentAmerican university, and top scholars from many areas of linguistics gather to teach classes to students fromaround the world. The students include college undergraduates and graduate students taking classes forcredit, as well as university teachers and researchers like me, just auditing the classes for fun. Before I went,I was a little worried that I would feel out of place as a 49-year-old, I found that I was far from the youngeststudent there, and with the common bond of linguistics, I enjoyed conversations with all kinds of people.

In addition to the classes themselves, the Institute features weekend workshops and linguistic-related lecturesand movies. This year, one highlight was a lecture by the most famous living linguist, Noam Chomsky. Buteven more interesting to many of us was the visit of Dan Everett, who has done extensive fieldwork on thenative Brazilian language Piraha. We saw a movie about Dan’s life and work, followed by a question-and-answersession, and a few days later, a demonstration of field-work methods used to learn an entirely new languagefrom an informant with whom you have no common language. Everett’s work is somewhat sensational in thathe claims that Piraha language contradicts the principles of Chomsky’s theory of Universal Grammar. We heardrumors that it had required some very delicate arrangements on the part of the organizers to get both Chomskyand Everett as guests at the same Institute, but the controversy generated some very interesting after-classdiscussions among Institute participants.

My own areas of research are in semantics and applied linguistics, and at the Institute, I was able to catch upon very new research related to these while also learning about some topics almost entirely new to me. Themost interesting class, as well as the most difficult one, was “The Bilingual Brain”. This introduced researchinto the way language is processed by the brain, and whether and to what extent the brains of bilingual ormultilingual people are different from those of monolinguals. (The short answer is: while there do appear to besome differences in the ways that the brains of monolinguals and bilinguals deal with language, it is difficult toknow exactly what these differences mean.)

The Bilingual Brain class included a visit to a brain-imaging laboratory on campus to see a demonstration ofNIRS (Near-Infrared Spectroscopy) imaging. In NIRS, light is sent through the skull, where it travels throughbrain tissue and is then picked up by sensors attached to the head. This method can locate the areas ofincreased brain activity—active areas use more blood, and the hemoglobin in the blood blocks some of thelight. In the demonstration, we watched the equipment being partially hooked up to just one student volunteer,but few weeks later, I was lucky enough to be able to experience it myself as a test subject. I was a controlsubject for a with normal hearing in a study of people with cochlear implants (surgical devices which can helppeople to hear.) In the photo, you can see me with the sensors attached to my head.

There was one more thing I loved about the Institute—the chance to spend every day in the company of peoplewho love linguistics, in a beautiful physical environment. Together with many of the Institute students andfaculty, I stayed in the university graduate housing located out on the edge of Ann Arbor. There many two storybuildings surrounded by large open areas of grass and trees—a landscape entirely unlike my home in Tokyo. Just outside my door, I could see red-tailed hawks in the sky, squirrels in the trees, groundhogs and rabbitseating grass by the side of the road, and best of all, deer strolling slowly through the campus. As we rodethe free bus from the dorms to the classes and events in central Ann Arbor, we talked and talked about —youguessed it—linguistics!

From the cool, green summer in Ann Arbor, it was a bit of a shock to return to the hot August in Tokyo, but eventhe one short month at the Institute helped to refresh and invigorate me, leaving me ready for the fall semesterat Waseda. I am already looking forward to attending the Institute again, the next time I have a sabbatical.

言語学と過ごした夏

ミューライゼン ヴィクトリア
国際学術院准教授

Using light to image the brai
脳のイメージをとらえるために光を照射

 2013年の春学期、私は早稲田大学から6ヶ月間のサバティカル(研究休暇)を頂きました。その内1ヶ月間はミシガン州のアナーバーで過ごし、ミシガン大学で開催されたアメリカ言語学会の夏季研修に参加することにしました。アメリカで開催されるこの研修は、1年おきに大学を変えて行われ、様々な分野から集まった言語学の最先端で活躍している学者たちが、世界中から集まった学生たちに講義を行います。生徒の中には、単位取得のために受講する大学生や大学院生がいれば、私のような大学教員や研究者もいて、それぞれに興味がある講義を聴講します。出発する前は、49歳の私が出席してもいい場所なのだろうかと少し心配していました。一番若い学生とはものすごく年が離れていましたが、言語学という共通の話題があったので、全ての人と楽しく会話をすることができました。

 この研修には、講義以外にも週末のワークショップ、言語学に関連する講演、映像放映なども含まれています。今年の目玉のひとつは、世界で最も有名な言語学者であるノーム・チョムスキーの講演でした。ですが参加者の多くにとって、ブラジル固有の言語であるピラハー語を幅広く研究しているダン・エバレットの来訪も、これに負けないくらい興味深いものでした。私たちはエバレットのこれまでの人生と研究を撮影した映像を見て、その後質疑応答のセッションが行われました。そして数日後、共通の言語を有していないインフォーマントから全く新しい言語を学ぶためのフィールドワークの実演が行われました。エバレットは、ピラハー語の主張するものがチョムスキーの普遍文法の法則に書かれた原則とは正反対であるという、何とも刺激的な研究結果を発表しています。チョムスキーとエバレットの両方を同じ研修のゲストとして呼ぶには、主催者側にとても繊細な調整が求められたそうです。しかしこの論争のおかげで、講義の終了後、研修の参加者たちの間で非常に興味深い議論が交わされました。

 この研修で、私自身の専門である意味論と応用言語学に関する最新の調査結果を知ることができました。また、今まではほとんど知らなかったトピックについても学ぶことができました。一番興味深く、そして一番難しかった講義は「バイリンガル脳」です。この講義では、脳が言語を処理する方法と、バイリンガルやマルチリンガルの脳とモノリンガルの脳に違いはあるのか、あるとすればどのような点が違うのかについてまとめた調査結果が紹介されました。(簡単にまとめるとこうなります。モノリンガルの脳とバイリンガルの脳では、言語の処理方法にいくつかの違いが表れるが、これらの違いが何を意味するのかをきちんと把握するのは難しい)

 バイリンガル脳の講義には、キャンパス内にある脳撮像研究所を訪問して、NIRS(近赤外分光法)イメージングのデモンストレーションを見学することも含まれていました。NIRSでは頭蓋骨を通過する光を照射し、脳組織の中でどのように移動するかを、頭に取り付けたセンサーで観測します。この方法によって、脳の活動が活性化する部分を見つけ出すことができます――活動している部分ではより多くの血液が使われ、血液中のヘモグロビンが光をブロックしてしまうからです。このデモンストレーションでは、ボランティアの学生に装置の一部が取り付けられているのを見ただけでしたが、数週間後、自分が被験者となるという幸運に恵まれました。人工内耳(音を聞こえやすくする外科装置)を装着した人の研究を行う際の、聴覚に不自由がない対照被検者となったのです。この写真をご覧ください。頭にセンサーをつけた私が映っています。

 研修が本当に楽しかったのには、もうひとつ理由があります――すばらしい施設の中で、言語学を愛する人たちと一緒に毎日を過ごすチャンスを頂けたからです。研修に参加した多くの学生や教授陣と共に、私はアナーバーキャンパスの外れにある大学院生用の寮に滞在しました。草木に囲まれた広い空き地の中に、2階建ての建物が数多く立っていました――東京の私の家とは全く違う光景でした。家を出るとすぐに、空を舞うアカオノスリが見えました。木にはリスがいて、道路の脇の草地にはウッドチャックとウサギが座っていました。そして何より素晴らしかったのは、シカがキャンパス内をゆっくりと歩き回っていたことです。寮からアナーバーキャンパスの中心部へは無料の送迎バスが運行されていたので、講義やイベントへ向かう時はこれに乗りました。バスの中で私たちは、たくさん語り合いました――何を話したかはお分かりでしょう――言語学についてです!

 涼しく緑に囲まれたアナーバーから暑い8月の東京に戻ってきて、ちょっと驚きました。わずか1ヶ月の研修でしたが、元気を取り戻すことができ、やる気が湧いてきました。早稲田大学での秋学期に向けた準備は万端です。次のサバティカルを頂いて、もう一度研修に参加するのが今から楽しみです。