早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 2013 早春号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼2013 早春号

A WASEDA Miscellany

本学外国人教員が、自らの研究のこと、趣味や興味あることなど日々の雑感を語ります。

Robert Ferenc VESZTEG

Some thoughts on rules

Robert Ferenc VESZTEG
Associate Professor, Faculty of Political Science and Economics

The Nobel-laureate James Tobin once claimed that incentives is the single word that sums up whateconomics is all about. As an economist, I believe in incentives and the importance of providing the correctones, and this is exactly what I teach in my classes on game theory and on the economics of information.At the same time, I am also aware of the risks that trying to provide too many incentives can entail, even ifthey are meant to be the correct ones. It is not only so because I also teach experimental economics, but mypersonal experience seems to suggest likewise.

The country in which I was born almost four decades ago in Central Europe was imposing numerous strictrules on its citizens’ actions. Those rules did not only govern economic and social transactions, but were alsomeant to apply to one’s private life and even thoughts. Let us give the benefit of the doubt to the inventors,as for my purpose here it suffices to recall the disaster they originated by trying to hold perfect control. Thedisaster lies not in that they failed in achieving the clearly impossible, that is to specify a complete set ofrules without internal contradictions and in benefit of the public interest, but that the very subjects to thoserules learnt how to bend them. People learnt to ignore the official rules and grew resourceful in finding thebackdoors. Now, while the wave of economic and political change of 1989 swept away the system with itsrulers and rules, Hungary has been unable to change its people’s mindset which has arguably been hinderingits development for more than 20 years now.

The country in which I earned my graduate degree almost a decade ago in Western Europe was operatingwith much fewer rules. The freedom it was offering was a refreshing experience as most problems couldbe solved with the help of face-to-face communication on an individual basis. Nevertheless, it also createdunexpected troubles when the very same question had different correct answers on different days dependingon the person on duty. And occasionally it was a terribly wasteful system because everybody felt entitled toa personalized treatment and solution to her problem. Spain is today one of Europe’s troubled countries withno light at the end of the tunnel, under the burden of severe corruption which seems to be widely expandedin the political elite, it has been affecting professional sports and has reached even the royal family.

The country in which I live and work now has uncountable rules and a system that makes it impossibleto bend or ignore them. Yet, Japan gives the background to an exciting innovative project which I amparticipating in: the creation and management of an English based degree program in Political Science andEconomics at Waseda University. We are in a privileged and crucial situation, because we get to set theincentives. Our task is to find the golden middle way between too few and too many rules. While the lattermight look tempting, we should be careful not to overwrite students’ intrinsic motivation and common sense.In the classroom, I tend to rely on students’ curiosity and sense of responsibility as much as possible (and afew specific rules take care of the rest). In other words, I prefer being a professor who teaches students tobeing a policeman or salesman taking care of his clients with the help of complex contracts. I am glad andthankful that I have found supporting partners, both colleagues and students, at Waseda in this endeavor. Ihope that our efforts will be rewarded with success and that we can efficiently work together on these termsfor a long time to come.

(If you have not heard about our program yet, do not hesitate to approach our office, faculty or students formore information. If you are a student, you may want to have a firsthand experience by registering for ourcourses and earning credits.)

ルールについて思うこと

ヴェステグ ロバート フェレンツ
政治経済学術院准教授

 ノーベル賞受賞者ジェームズ・トービンはかつて、経済学のすべてを集約して言い表す一語がインセンティブであると述べたことがあります。一経済学者として、私はインセンティブと正しさを期すことの重要性を信じています。そして、それこそがまさに私が担当するゲーム理論と情報経済学のクラスで教えていることです。同時に、私はたとえ正しいものであっても、過剰なインセンティブを提供することのリスクも承知しています。それは私が実験経済学を教えているからだけでなく、私の個人的経験からも、そのように示唆されるからです。

 私が約40年前に生まれた中央ヨーロッパの国では、市民の行動に数多くの厳格なルールを課していました。それらのルールは、経済的・社会的な取引を統制するだけではなく、個人の私生活や思想さえも対象にする意図を持ったものでした。これらルールの発案者たちが完全な統制を維持しようとしたために引き起こされた災難について言及すれば、ここでの私の目的は十分に果たせるので、あえて、彼らに有利な解釈をしてみましょう。その災難の原因は、ルールの発案者たちが明らかに不可能なことを成し遂げられなかったこと、すなわち内部矛盾がなく、公共の福祉に利する完全なルール一式を規定できなかったことではなく、それらルールの対象となる人々がルールを捻じ曲げる方法を覚えたことにあります。人々は公のルールを無視することを覚え、抜け道を見つける知恵をつけました。さて、ハンガリーでは、1989年の経済的・政治的変化の波が統治者と彼らが定めたルールともども、そのシステムを一掃したにもかかわらず、国の発展をおそらく20年以上も妨げている人々の考え方を変えることはできませんでした。

 私が約10年前に大学院課程を修了した西ヨーロッパの国は、はるかに少ないルールで運営されていました。ほとんどの問題が個別の対面コミュニケーションの助けによって解決できたため、その国が提供してくれた自由はさわやかな経験でした。しかしそれによって、同じ問題であってもその日の担当者によって正しい答えが異なるという、思いがけないトラブルも生じました。そして、誰もが自分にあった個別の対応で問題を解決してもらう権利があると思っていたため、時としてそれは非常に不経済なシステムでした。現在、スペインはヨーロッパの問題国のひとつであり、深刻な腐敗が負担となり、トンネルの出口が見えない状態にあります。腐敗は政治エリート層に蔓延し、プロスポーツ界に影響を与え、王室にさえ達しています。

 私が現在、暮らし、働いているこの国には、無数のルールと、そのルールを曲げたり無視したりすることができないシステムがあります。しかし、日本は私が参加している刺激的な革新的プロジェクトである、早稲田大学政治経済学部の英語ベースプログラムの構築とマネジメントに携わることを可能にする環境を提供してくれます。インセンティブを設けなければならないため、私たちは、特権があると同時に非常に重要な立場に置かれています。私たちの課題は、少なすぎず、多すぎない、ほどよい数のルールを定めることです。つい多すぎるルールを定めがちですが、学生たちがもともと持っているやる気と常識を削いでしまわないように注意しなければなりません。クラスでは、私はできるだけ生徒の好奇心と責任感に任せるようにしています(あとは、わずかな具体的なルールで対応します)。言い換えると、私は、警官、あるいは複雑な契約の手助けをし顧客の面倒を見るセールスマンより、学生を教える教授でありたいのです。私は早稲田で、この取り組みをサポートしてくれるパートナーを同僚や学生の双方から得られることをうれしく思い、感謝しています。私たちの努力が実を結び、今後も長く、同じ条件で効率的に一丸となって取り組んでいけることを願っています。

 (私たちのプログラムをまだご存知でなければ、詳細について、オフィス、教員、学生に気軽にお尋ねください。あなたが学部生でしたら、このコースに登録し、単位を取得して、実際に体験してみるのもいいでしょう。)