早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 錦秋号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼錦秋号

A WASEDA Miscellany

FAGAN, Timothy Jay

Stories in Rocks from Earth and Other Places

FAGAN, Timothy Jay
Associate Professor, Faculty of Education and Integrated Arts and Sciences

In the first semester of my second year in college, I took a course that changed my life. The course was Introduction to Geology. It was an introduction to looking at rocks, landscapes, photographs and maps, and using these observations to interpret the natural history and natural processes of our home planet. In other words, it was an introduction to reading rocks to understand stories about nature.

The course was taught by Dr. Donald Potter at Hamilton College, which is located in a rural area of upstate New York and has on its campus a couple of small streams that cut down into bedrock. I remember walking out into the woods to find stations that were labeled on a map, and at each station there were questions to guide students through specific observations at each outcrop. The streams cut down through many shales, or mudstones, and a few limestones. The rocks were of Silurian agea little over 400 million years old, which sounds old, but is less than one-tenth of the age of the Earth. Then there were summary questions: “Were the Silurian seas in upstate New York muddy or clear?”I remember thinking, “with all of this shale, the seas must have been muddy”. It was the beginning of my realization that the rocks contained clues about the history of the Earth, and that I could use my eyes and hands to read the clues to understand the formation of mountains and volcanoes and ocean basins and the movements of tectonic plates across the Earth’s surface and the structure of the Earth’s interior. I began to realize that geology combines simple observations with scientific principles to understand how the Earth works as a system and to understand the stories in rocks that, when combined together, make up the story of the Earth.

Now, over thirty years later, I am still looking at rocks and there always seems to be something interesting to see. My samples come from different parts of North American and Japan, and have even extended to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and a comet. I use electron microscopes and mass spectrometers; images from airplanes, telescopes and satellites; images that extend beyond the visible range of the human eye to gamma rays, x-rays and infrared light. I had no inkling of these techniques back in the day when I was standing in a stream in upstate New York, swatting mosquitoes and looking at Silurian shales. But the process of being a careful observer and connecting the observations to make a coherent story about nature is still the same.

So, that introductory course set me on a path that would lead to work in applied geology, followed by a transition to research in planetary science. This path would also lead, even more unpredictably, to Waseda University and Japan, and the experience of living in a culture that is different from the one I was born into. People ask me how I like living in Japan, and I feel quite fortunate in my day-to-day life here. Many aspects of life here are much the same as they would be in the US, but of course, with the differences in language and culture, life is dramatically different, too. Logically, these two statements appear to contradict each other: how can day-to-day life in two different places be both the same and different? Yet, they are both true. How the two statements can be true is a mystery, but the mystery does not detract from the truth. I do not think this really can be explained, but I have faith that it can be lived, and that the differences and “samenesses” both can be respected.

Here at Waseda, we are in day-to-day contact with students. Who knows where they will go from here? We owe them the opportunity to find passion in their lives. Again, who knows? That passion may come from books or bugs or music or math, or maybe even rocks.

地球と宇宙の岩が教えてくれる物語

フェイガン・ティモシー・ジェイ
教育・総合科学学術院准教授

Full Moon seen from Waseda campus
早稲田キャンパスから見た満月

 大学2年生の1学期、私は人生を変える授業に出会いました。地質学入門という授業です。岩や地形、写真や地図を観察し、それをもとに地球の自然の歴史と自然界で起こった現象を解釈する入門授業でした。それはいわば、岩を読み解き、自然の物語を知る第一歩でした。

 授業を教えてくださったのは、ハミルトン・カレッジのドナルド・ポッター教授でした。ハミルトン・カレッジはニューヨーク州北部の農村地域にある大学で、キャンパス内には岩場を流れる小川があります。地図上にある岩層の観測点を探しに森に入り、各観測点には、そこの岩層での観察を促す質問が書いてあったのを覚えています。小川が流れる岩盤には、頁岩、泥岩、あるいは石灰岩が見られました。それらの岩は役4億年以上前のシルリア紀のものでした。古いように思えますが、地球の年齢からいえば10分の1にも満たないのです。そして最後には、まとめの質問がありました「シルリア紀において、ニューヨーク北部の海は濁っていたでしょうか。それとも澄んでいたでしょうか」。私はその当時、「これほどの頁岩があるのだから、濁っていたに違いない」と考えたのを覚えています。それは、岩が地球の歴史を読み解く手がかりを秘めており、自らの目と手を使って、山や火山、海盆の形成、地球の表面を覆うプレートの動き、地球の内部の構造などを理解し、知るヒントを得ることができると気付くきっかけでした。地質学とは、単純な観察と科学的な原理を組み合わせて、地球がどのように1つのシステムとして機能しているかを理解し、岩に秘められた物語様々を知ることができると気付いたのです。そしてそれらの物語は1つにすると、地球そのものの物語となるのです。

 30年以上たった今でも、岩を観察すると、常におもしろいものが見つかります。私の標本は北アメリカと日本の様々な地域から採取されており、月、火星、隕石、彗星から採取された標本もあります。電子顕微鏡や質量分析計を使い、様々な画像を分析します。航空機、望遠鏡、衛星からの画像、人間の目では観察できないガンマ線、X線、赤外線の画像などです。ニューヨーク北部の小川で、たかってくる蚊をたたきながら頁岩を観察していたときには、これらの技術のことを考えつきもしませんでした。しかし、慎重な観察者となり、観察したものを結びつけて、自然について1つのまとまった物語を作る過程は、今でも同じです。

 このようにして、1度の入門授業によって、私は応用地質学の道を歩むことになり、やがて惑星科学の研究へと広がっていきました。この道は、予想もしていなかったことですが、日本へ、そして早稲田大学へと続き、私は生まれ育った文化圏とは全く異なる環境に身を置くこととなりました。日本に住むのは好きかどうか尋ねられるのですが、私はここでの日々に幸運を実感しています。ここでの生活は様々な面においてアメリカでのそれに似ています。しかし、言語と文化の違いのせいで、劇的に異なっているとも言えます。論理的には、これらは矛盾しているように思われます。2つの違う場所での毎日の生活が、同じであると同時に異なっていることなどあり得るのでしょうか。それが、あり得るのです。両方ともが真実であり得る理由はまったくの謎です。しかし、それが真実であることには変わりはありません。これをうまく説明することはできないと思いますが、そのような生活をすることは可能であり、異なる点も同じ点も、尊重することができると思います。

 ここ早稲田大学において、私は日々学生たちとふれあっています。彼らが今後どのような人生を歩むかなど、誰に分かるでしょうか。私たちにできることは、彼らが人生において情熱を燃やせることを見つけられる機会を与えることです。何度も言いますが、先のことなど誰にも分かりません。その情熱は、本から、虫から、音楽から、数学から、はたまた岩から生まれるかもしれないのです。