早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 新緑号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼新緑号

A WASEDA Miscellany

James M. Vardaman

Discovering African America

James M. Vardaman
Professor, Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences

Growing up in the Deep South, which consists of the states between Georgia on the Atlantic Ocean and Louisiana on the Mississippi River, my world was composed of black folks and white folks. These two groups were divided by the train line that passed through Laurel, Mississippi, where I was raised. The black folks came across the tracks to work for the white folks during the day and then drifted back across “their side of the tracks” at the end of the day. The only exception to this was the Mexican man who sold tamales. He set up his stand in the early evening along the white side of the tracks, so that white folk could buy his tamales on their own side and black folk could briefly cross the tracks, make their purchases and then retreat to the black side of town.

When I began college in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1965, the implicit and explicit boundaries between white and black were beginning to break up. The Civil Rights Movement was challenging Jim Crow laws and customs one city at a time, one school at a time, and one person at a time. Black folks and some white folks hoped that progress would continue steadily and peacefully until some day in the future everyone would have the same opportunities and receive the same respect. The assassination of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968 in the city where I was studying seriously rocked those hopes.

While attending graduate school in the North, I was often asked to explain what the South was like and why it seemed such a backward place. This was the first time I seriously thought about the subject that I currently teach. Midway through graduate studies, quite out of the blue I had an opportunity to come to Japan for eighteen months as an English instructor. I knew absolutely nothing about the country, but it sounded like an adventure, so I came. During that year and a half, I spent most of my time outside the classroom trying to learn Japanese and everything possible about Japanese culture, while trying to explain in the classroom what America was like.

After returning to the U.S. completely fascinated with Japan, I entered a masters program dealing with every aspect of Japanese history, literature, society and culture. Upon graduation, I returned to Japan with a deeper curiosity about Japanese people and their culture. While traveling around virtually every part of Japan seeing as much as I could during university vacations, I taught about America, and increasingly taught Southern literature and culture. It struck me as ironic that I had returned determined to absorb as much as possible about Japan but had ended up studying with equal energy the American South and particularly African Americans and their cultural history.

What now motivates me to encourage students to learn about the South is that an understanding of it helps them become aware just how complex America is, historically, socially and culturally. My motivation for helping students learn about African Americans is to help them discover just how important a role these people have played in the development of the U.S., from the days of slavery to the present day. Discovering how blacks were brought as slaves to America, how they literally built America, how they fought for their freedom, how they supported one another against white oppression and how they identify themselves today broadens one’s views of America as a whole.

With the 2008 election of the son of a white woman and an exchange student from Africa, many people assumed that finally America had attained the dream Dr. King so eloquently expressed. But as President Obama himself has pointed out, his election has not signaled the achievement of racial equality. The white-black gap in wages, educational levels, occupational advancement and social acceptance remains, and it is made even more complicated by competition from the Hispanics of various national origins. In short, understanding the struggles and the achievements of African Americans to date is absolutely essential for comprehending American culture.in all of its colors.

Medallions issued to slaves sent to work for other people in Charleston, South Carolina, in the 1800s.
1800年代、サウスカロライナ州のチャールストンで、主人以外の人間のために働くよう命じられた奴隷に与えられたメダル。

Profile

Born in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. Received the M.Div. degree from Princeton Theological Seminary and the M.A. degree in Japanese Studies from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

He has written

『黒人差別とアメリカ公民権運動』(集英社新書、2007)
『ロックを生んだアメリカ南部ルーツミュージックの文化的背景』(日本放送出版協会、2006)
『アメリカ南部』(講談社現代新書、1995)
『アメリカ黒人の歴史』(NHK出版、2011)

歴史を学び、国を知る

ジェームス・M・バーダマン
文学学術院教授

 大西洋に面するジョージア州と、ミシシッピ川の流れるルイジアナ州の間にある州から成る、いわゆる深南部で育った私にとって、世界には白人と黒人、2種類の人種が暮らしていました。それら2つのグループは、私の育ったミシシッピ州のローレルという町を通る電車の線路をはさんで、反対側に暮らしていました。黒人たちは、昼間は仕事のため、線路を越えてこちら側にやってきて、一日が終わると、「自分たちの側」に帰っていきました。唯一の例外は、タマーリ売りのメキシコ人男性でした。夕方になると彼は、白人が住む側の線路脇に屋台を開きました。そうすることで、白人たちは自分たちの側から出ずにタマーリを買うことができました。黒人たちはといえば、足早に線路を渡り、買い物が済んだら黒人側に戻っていったのです。

 1965年に、私はテネシーのメンフィスで大学に通い始め、その頃は白人と黒人の境界線は、目に見えるものもそうでないものも、なくなり始めていました。公民権運動は、町や学校、そして一人ひとりの中でいっせいに普及し、黒人差別法とその習慣に立ち向かいました。黒人と、一部の白人は、このまま順調に、そして平和的にこの流れが続いていき、いつか皆が平等に機会を得て、尊重される日が来ることを望んでいたのです。1968年に私が学んでいた町で起きた、マーティン・ルーサー・キング・ジュニア牧師の暗殺は、この望みを揺るがすものでした。

 北部の大学院に通っていたとき、私はよく南部がどんなところで、なぜ裏庭のようなところに思えるのかしばしば尋ねられました。このとき、私は今教えている教科について初めて真剣に考えたのです。大学院の研究のなかばで、全くもって突然、私は英語の講師として18ヶ月日本に滞在する機会を得ました。日本については何も知りませんでしたが、冒険のようで楽しそうだったので、私は行くことにしました。日本にいた1年半のほとんどを私は教室の外で過ごし、日本語と日本文化について可能な限り学ぼうとし、そして教室ではアメリカがどんなところかを説明しようとしました。

 すっかり日本の虜になってアメリカに戻った私は、日本の歴史、文学、社会、文化など、あらゆる側面を研究する修士課程を開始しました。卒業したとき、私は日本人と日本文化に対する好奇心をより深いものとし、再び日本に戻りました。大学の休暇で、私は日本全国を巡り、できる限り色々見て回りました。私はアメリカ、特に南部の文学や文化について教えました。日本について可能な限り学んで来ようと心に決めてきたのに、アメリカ南部、特にアフリカ系アメリカ人と彼らの文化や歴史についても同じくらい注力して学んだのは皮肉と言えましょう。

 私が学生に南部について学ぶよう勧める理由は、南部について理解することで、アメリカという国が歴史的、社会的、文化的にどんなに複雑かに気付くことができるからです。学生がアフリカ系アメリカ人について学ぶ手助けをしたいのは、奴隷の時代から現在まで、アメリカの発展においてこれらの人々がどれだけ重要な役割を果たしたかを学んで欲しいからです。黒人がいかにして奴隷としてアメリカに連れてこられ、文字通りアメリカを造り、自由を求めて闘い、力を合わせて白人の迫害に耐え、そして今日自分たちをどのように認識しているかを理解することで、アメリカに対する考え方を広げることができます。

 2008年、白人女性とアフリカからの交換留学生の間に生まれた息子が大統領に選ばれたことで、多くの人は、キング牧師が雄弁に語った夢をアメリカはついに成し遂げたのだと考えました。しかし、オバマ大統領自身が指摘したように、彼の当選は人種の平等を意味するわけではありません。白人と黒人の間の賃金、教育、昇進、社会的受容における格差は未だに残っており、中南米からの移民との競争により、事態はさらに複雑なものとなっています。手短に言えば、これまでのアフリカ系アメリカ人の苦闘と彼らが成し遂げてきたことについて理解することは、さまざまな文化が混じり合ったアメリカの文化を理解するにあたって、必要不可欠なことなのです。

プロフィール
ジェームス・M・バーダマン
文学学術院教授

アメリカテネシー州のメンフィスに生まれる。プリンストン神学校において神学の修士号を取得し、ハワイ大学マノア校において、日本研究の修士号を取得。