早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 錦秋号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼錦秋号

A WASEDA Miscellany

Manuela Almaraz

Life in Japan― As exciting as ever.

David Hooper
Professor, Faculty of Political Science and Economics

I suppose it’s inevitable that the longer you live in a place, the more blasé you become about events that surround you ― events that only a comparatively short time earlier would have been curiously unusual, quite fascinating and, on occasions, completely shocking. The world is getting smaller, and the opportunity to travel and experience different cultures and societies has never been easier. The number of foreign students now enrolled at Waseda is at an all time high, and there is an abundance of overseas study programmes for Japanese students. Things, however, were not always thus.

I came to Japan on my own as a teenager in the 1970s, determined to practise karate at the Japan Karate Association’s main dojo in Tokyo. As a foreigner in Japan in those days, I frequently felt as if I were on display ― not so much as a celebrity in a crowd ; more on the lines of an escapee from the local zoo that everyone suspects is really quite harmless, but nobody wants to be the first to approach too closely. It is hard to imagine now that being a foreigner in central Tokyo in the late 70s could make you the object of such intense curiosity.

I remember being seated on the train one day, returning home after the morning’s karate practice. A small child, about four or five years of age, suddenly noticed me. He stared for several seconds, his features temporarily frozen in shock as it suddenly dawned on him that all those stories he had heard about the existence of life on other worlds were actually true. Without taking his eyes off me he grabbed his mother’s arm and proclaimed in a voice loud enough for the whole carriage to hear,

“Hora! Gaijin da!” (God! It’s an alien!)

The mother, I was sure, would quickly admonish her son for his rudeness. She would no doubt explain to the child that it wasn’t my fault that I had had the misfortune to be born non-Japanese, and that it was impolite to draw attention on a crowded train to the obvious deformities that characterized my kind : strangely coloured eyes, body hair, huge noses and preposterously tall. This was, however, Japan. The mother turned her head in my direction, and then, in a voice almost as loud as that of her forthright offspring exclaimed,

“Honto da!” (Gosh! You’re right!)

Life was so exciting in the 70s!

Japan, alas, no longer feels as exhotic as it once did, and visitors to these shores are not the rarity they once were. That’s not to say, however, that coming to this country is not a stimulating and rewarding experience. Life is what you make it. Foreign students fortunate enough to have the chance to study here at Waseda, can experience a unique cultural setting through which they can learn not only about their host country, but about themselves.

As I flew back to Narita at the end of this summer, after teaching karate in Thailand and Nepal, I couldn’t help thinking that even after so many years in Japan, the novelty hadn’t yet quite worn off.

Teaching the Waseda High School Karate-bu
早稲田大学高等学院空手部で指導。

日本での生活― 今もなおエキサイティング

デビッド・フーパー
政治経済学術院教授

 同じ場所に長く住めば住むほど、周りの出来事―ほんの少し前であったら奇妙で珍しく、非常に魅惑的で時に全くショッキングであっただろう出来事―に関心がなくなると思う。世界はどんどん狭くなっており、旅をして異なる文化や社会を体験することがこれまでにないほど容易になっている。早稲田に入学する外国人留学生の人数が過去最高となり、日本人学生のための海外留学プログラムも豊富にある。しかし、常にそうであったというはわけではない。

 1970年代に十代であった私は東京にある日本空手協会の総本部道場で空手を習おうと決意し、一人で日本にやってきた。当時、日本にいる外国人として、私はまるで見せ物ではないかと感じることがたびたびあった。群衆の中にいる有名人という意味でではなく、どちらかといえば、地元の動物園から逃げ出してきて、実際はまったく危害を加えないのだろうが、誰も自分が最初に近づきたくないと思う動物の類という意味だ。1970年代の東京の真ん中で外国人であるだけで、これほどまで好奇の目にさらされていたとは、今では信じられないだろう。

 ある日空手の朝稽古から帰宅する電車で座っていた時のことを思い出す。4、5歳くらいの一人の幼い子が突然私の存在に気付いた。その子は数秒間私をじっと見て、違う世界で存在する生命についてその子が聞かされていた話が実は全部本当だったのだと突然知り、ショックで一瞬表情を凍りつかせた。その子は私から目を離さず、母親の腕をつかみ、車両全体に聞こえるほどの大きな声でこう訴えたのだった。

 「ほら!外人だ!」

 母親はすぐに自分の息子の無礼を叱るだろう、と私は確信していた。彼女はきっと自分の子供に、私が不幸にも日本人として生まれなかったことは私のせいではないこと、そして電車の中で、私が外国人であることを特徴付ける、見るからに奇妙な形をしたものに注目を集めさせることが失礼であると言って聞かせるだろう。変な色をした目、体毛、巨大な鼻に馬鹿げたほど高い背。しかし、これが日本であった。その母親は私の方に顔を向け、率直な自分の息子と同じぐらい大きな声でこう叫んだのだった。

 「ほんとだ!」

 70年代の生活はなんとまあエキサイティングであったか!

 悲しいかな、日本にはかつてのような異国情緒を感じなくなったし、日本に来る観光客は以前ほど珍しくなくなった。だが、それは日本に行くことが刺激的で実りある体験ではないということではない。人生は自分で作るものだ。ここ早稲田で学ぶ機会がある幸運な外国人留学生は、独特の文化の環境で、自分を受け入れる国についてのみならず、自分自身についても学ぶことができる。

 今年の夏の終わりに、タイとネパールで空手を教えて成田に戻ったときも、日本にこれほど長く住んでいるのに、新鮮味が薄れていると感じないなと考えずにいられなかった。