早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 新緑号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼新緑号

A WASEDA Miscellany

Gaye Rowley

Last Chance for a Liberal Education

Gaye Rowley
Professor, School of Law Adjunct Professor, School of International Liberal Studies

Japan’s population may be falling, but the world is an increasingly crowded andcompetitive place. By 2012, there will be an estimated seven billion people on the planet, more than double the number who were alive when I was born. To be“successful” by any measure requires a level of application and an ability to focus that I don’t remember having when I was younger; the effort required to be among the chosen―by schools, universities, employers of whatever sort―seems so much greater now than it used to be. I have nothing but admiration for the young people of Waseda and the way they knuckle down to make their way in the very imperfect world that we, their elders, have created.

Complaining about “young people today” is a sign that one is getting older and so I try to resist the temptation to carp. Nonetheless, occasionally I wish that my students would take more risks. I wish, for example, that they would take more courses for their own interest, not because they think studying X or Y will help them to get a job.
Humanities subjects such as history, foreign languages, and literature aren’t finite blocks of knowledge than can be taught (and tested). Rather, they help us learn how to evaluate arguments and express ourselves clearly, to re-interpret our cultural heritage, and sensitize ourselves to other ways of thinking about the world. As the philosopher Martha Nussbaum has recently reminded us, studying humanities subjects also helps to keep democracy alive, because such study develops citizens’ abilities to think for themselves and to understand the significance of another person’s sufferings and achievements.*

My other wish is that more of my students would go abroad for a period during their university days. In these straitened economic times, I realize that many families struggle to send their children to university and that as a consequence, students feel under pressure to graduate in good time. (We also need to do more to make the benefits of a Waseda education available to those who can’t afford to pay for it.) Waseda offers so many fabulous short and yearlong study abroad programs, as well as the chance to volunteer for a wide variety of good causes overseas. Recent tragic events have reminded us that life is short. Why play it safe? Don’t waste these oncein- a-lifetime opportunities!

* Martha C. Nussbaum, Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (Princeton University Press, 2010).

2008 Spring Semester with my students
2008年前期、学生たちと

一般教養を身につける最後の機会

ゲイ・ローリー
法学学術院教授
国際教養学部非常勤教授

 日本の人口は減少しているかもしれませんが、世界はより多くの人であふれ、競争も激化しています。2012年までに地球の人口は、私が生まれた当時の2倍以上にあたる70億人に達すると予測されています。何らかの形で「成功する」ためには、私が若かった頃は持っていなかったようなレベルの努力と集中力必要とされているのです。どのような学校や大学、雇用主からであれ、自らが選ばれるためには、これまで以上に多大な努力が必要であるように思われます。私たち大人が作り出した非常に不完全なこの社会において、真面目に自らの道を切り開いていこうとする早稲田大学の若者たちには、私は感心するばかりです。

 「最近の若者」の愚痴を言うのは年を取った証拠ですから、文句を言う衝動は抑えるようにしています。とはいえ時には学生たちに、もっと冒険すればいいのに、と思うこともあります。例えば学生たちには、XやYといった教科が就職に有利だから、などという理由ではなく、自らの関心によって教科を選んで欲しいのです。歴史、外国語、文学などの人文学系の教科は、教えられて試験を受けるだけという、限定された知識ではありません。むしろ、私たちが議論を評価し、自分の考えを明確に述べ、自分たちの文化的遺産を再解釈することを助け、世の中に関する自分とは異なる考え方に対して敏感にしてくれます。哲学者のマーサ・ヌスバウムが最近私たちに思い起こさせてくれたように、人文学系の教科を学ぶことは民主主義に活力を与えます。なぜならこういった教科は市民が自ら考える力、そして他者の苦悩や功績を理解する力を育てるからです。*

 私のもうひとつの願いは、もっと多くの学生が大学時代に留学をすることです。経済状況がこれほど悪い時に、多くの家庭は子供を大学に行かせるために苦労をしていることでしょう。その結果、学生たちは留年せずに卒業しなければならないというプレッシャーを感じています(大学も、学費を払う余裕のない学生でも早稲田大学の教育の恩恵を受けられるよう、さらに援助を行う必要があります)。早稲田には短期のものから1年間に及ぶものまで、多くのすばらしい留学プログラムが用意されており、同時に、様々な目的のボランティア活動を海外で行う機会もあります。近年の悲劇的な出来事の数々により、私たちは人生は短いのだということを再確認しました。なぜ安全な道を渡るのでしょうか。一生に一度しかないチャンスを、みすみす逃してはなりません。

 *マーサ・C・ヌスバウム著『利益のためではなく:なぜ民主主義のために人文学が必要なのか』“Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities”(プリンストン大学出版局、2010年)