早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 盛夏号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼盛夏号

A WASEDA Miscellany

Nicholas O. Jungheim

Does Time Really Tell Or Is It Only My Imagination?

Nicholas O. Jungheim, Ed.D.
Professor, Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences
(School of Culture, Media and Society )

“Please write about how you came to be at Waseda University, your research interests, and your impressions of Waseda students in 800 words or less." This is a tall order, but it is also an opportunity to reflect on 38 years of living in Japan and 31 years of teaching at Japanese universities. In fact, all of these themes are intertwined, so it pays to start at the beginning all the way back when I was 19 years old.

At that time it was very important for young men in the United States to have some kind of military deferment to keep them out of the army and from becoming canon fodder for the Vietnam War. For various reasons I was unable to maintain one, and due to the draft, I was ordered to report for induction into the U.S. Army in August of 1969 just missing my chance to head for the Woodstock Festival. I had already been accepted as a conscientious objector but did not object to serving my country. This meant not being trained to use weapons to kill people but rather to receive training to become a medical corpsman and a major target on the battlefield with a red cross on the helmet for a target. Thanks to a quirk of fate, I was one of the few troops in my training company to escape Vietnam and be shipped off to Okinawa instead.

After a very uneventful stay in that tropical paradise, I returned to school to study Japanese and Chinese history at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This was before the Japan boom, and my university did not have any Japanese language classes, my primary interest at the time. That led to my first encounter with Waseda University as a student of Japanese at the Institute for Language Teaching in a prefab classroom on the roof of Building 7 where you could watch the Chukakuha and Kakumaruha students fight it out below during the lunch break. Of course, this was 1972 before the Oil Shock or the lynching of a radical student by members of his group. Looking at the peaceful campus today, it is hard to imagine the kind of radical behavior exhibited on campus so many years ago.

After graduating from another private university in Tokyo and a five-year stint as an editor of an English language paper in Tokyo, I landed my first teaching position at an anonymous university well outside of the confines of Tokyo. By 1988, I found myself also teaching part-time to students of the Waseda University School of Letters Arts and Sciences. Things were still pretty noisy on campus with megaphones blaring and giant signboards protesting this or that.

At the same time I had a radio show on Bunkahosou as part of the daily English for Millions series. This proved to be the impetus for my current interest in the second language acquisition of gestures. I was asked by Obunsha to write an article for their magazine about 33 gestures that English learners should know. An outcome of that was my first classroom study of the acquisition of gestures, because I was curious if teaching these gestures would really lead to their acquisition. In short, it didn’t, regardless of the teaching approach. In spite of this, I have continued studying gesture acquisition from various perspectives in language testing and in pragmatics.

Another link between students and my research involved a study of student attention. I was curious if Japanese learners of English paid attention to Japanese teachers of English and native speakers of English in the same way. Analyzing two equivalent periods of teacher-fronted activities in two classes, I found that there was no significant difference in the percentage of learners’ gaze, or attention, in three directions: teacher, peer, and other. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of gaze direction changes, and this was related to the native speaker asking more questions in English. Every time the native speaker asked a question students looked at the textbook, then at a friend, then at the teacher, and then repeated this sequence. This information could be useful to the teacher as feedback about the students’ lack of understanding, or it could mean that the students are very engaged in the classroom. How should a teacher interpret such behavior, positively or negatively?

Some years ago I found myself misinterpreting a student’s behavior, and discovering the truth was a real eye opener. A young lady in my required English class was frequently late or absent and tended to fall asleep when not working with other students. I was concerned that the class was not challenging enough, but she worked fine in groups and her written work was satisfactory. Only later did she tell me that she had low blood pressure, making it difficult to get up in the morning and to stay awake in class. There were various options for interpreting the student’s behavior, and it turns out that the unexpected option was the correct one. We should be cautious not to jump to conclusions about how our students feel. We are often wrong.

All in all, though, I am very positive about Waseda students these days. I find them to be sociable and enthusiastic when given challenging things to do. We should be empowering our student to become autonomous learners. It is unfortunate that just when they should be developing their interests, they are also being pressured to start looking for jobs. I do not see this situation improving anytime soon.

In spite of my age, I like to think positively about students. There is a lot of hope for them, for Waseda, and for this great country of Japan. When things get me down, I just get out my banjo and pluck a few tunes. Everything becomes simpler, and I am ready to face another day.

年の功で分かるようになるものか、それともただの思い込みか?

ニコラス・O・ユングハイム/文学学術院教授(文化構想学部) 教育学博士

 「早稲田大学で教えることになった経緯、あなたの関心のある研究分野、そして早稲田の学生の印象を、800ワード以内で表現してください」。これは難しい注文だ。しかし、38年間の日本での生活と日本の大学で31年間教鞭をとってきたことを振り返るよい機会でもある。実際、これらのテーマはすべて、互いに関連している。そういうわけで、はるか昔にさかのぼって私が19歳だった頃から始めてみよう。

 当時の合衆国の若者にとって、軍隊に入らないで済むために、そしてベトナム戦争の砲弾の餌食になることを避けるために何らかの徴兵猶予の理由をもつことが非常に重要だった。だが私は、様々な事情で徴兵を延期することができず、1969年8月、合衆国軍隊に入隊するために出頭するように命じられ、ウッドストック・フェスティバルに行くチャンスを一足違いで逃した。私はすでに良心的兵役拒否者として受け入れられていたが、国のために尽くすことに異論はなかった。これは、殺人のための武器の使い方の代わりに、衛生兵となる訓練を受け、敵の標的となりやすい赤十字をヘルメットにつけることを意味していた。運命のいたずらか、私はベトナム行きを逃れ、沖縄に送られる訓練隊の数少ない中隊の一員となった。

 その熱帯の楽園での平穏無事な滞在の後、私は日本と中国の歴史を学ぶためにイリノイ大学シカゴ校に復学した。これは日本ブームが始まる前のことで、その大学には当時私が一番高い関心をもっていた日本語のクラスがなかった。それが、早稲田大学との初めての出会いにつながった。私は語学教育研究所の日本語の学生となった。教室は7号館の屋上のプレハブで、昼休みには、中核派と革マル派の学生が戦う様子が眼下に見えた。もちろんこれは1972年のことで、石油ショックや過激派グループによる学生のリンチ事件が起こる前のことだった。今日の平穏なキャンパスを見ると、何年も前にそのような過激な行動が同じ場所で行われていたとは、とても信じられない。

 東京にある別の私立大学を卒業し、東京で英字新聞の編集者を5年間務めた後、東京からは離れた場所に位置するある大学で最初の教職についた。1988年には、非常勤講師として早稲田大学文学部の学生にも教えるようになっていた。その頃キャンパスはまだかなり騒々しく、メガホンがけたたましくがなり立て、巨大なプラカードがあれやこれやと抗議していた。

 同時期、私は毎日放送されていた「100万人の英語シリーズ」の一部として文化放送のラジオ番組も担当していた。これは、第二言語のジェスチャー習得という、現在の関心への筋道もつけてくれた。私は旺文社から、英語学習者が知っておくべき33のジェスチャーについての雑誌記事を執筆するよう依頼を受けた。その結果、私の最初の授業はジェスチャーの習得に関するものとなった。ジェスチャーを教えることが本当に言語の習得につながるかどうか興味があった。結論を先に言うと、ジェスチャーを教えても言語の習得にはつながらなかった。このことにもかかわらず、言語上の実験や語用論の様々な観点からジェスチャー習得についての研究を続けている。

 学生に関するもう一つのテーマは、授業中の集中力に関するものだ。日本人の英語学習者が、日本人の英語教師と英語のネイティブスピーカーの両者に同じように注目しているかどうかに興味があった。同じ期間に行われた教師主導の2つの授業を分析した結果、教師、クラスメート、その他という3つの注視方向の割合には大きな差が見られなかった。しかしながら、注視方向の変化頻度には大きな違いがみられた。これは、ネイティブスピーカーが英語でより多くの質問をすることに関係していた。ネイティブスピーカーが質問をするたびに、学生は教科書、クラスメート、それから教師を見る、という一連の動作を繰り返した。これは、学生の理解不足を示すサインとして教師の役に立つかもしれないし、あるいは学生が授業に熱心に参加していることを意味するのかもしれない。教師はそのような行動を、肯定的または否定的、どちらに解釈することが望ましいのだろうか?

 何年か前、学生の行動を誤解していると分かったことがあり、その真実は私にとって大きな発見となった。私の必修英語クラスに、遅刻や欠席を頻繁に繰り返し、他の学生たちと一緒に作業していないときには居眠りをしがちな女子学生がいた。私は、授業が物足りないのかと懸念したが、彼女はグループ作業ではよくやっており、課題も満足のいく出来だった。あとになって初めて、低血圧のため朝起きることや授業中に起きていることが辛いということを打ち明けてくれた。学生の行動を解釈するには様々な選択肢があり、意外な選択肢が正解の場合もある。私たちは、学生がどう感じているかについて短絡的な判断をするべきではない。教師が間違うこともよくあるのだ。

 それでも概して、私は最近の早稲田の学生に関しては非常に肯定的だ。やりがいのある課題を与えられれば、生徒たちも社交的で熱心になれると分かった。私たち教師は、学生たちが自主的に学習できるようにすべきだ。残念なことに彼らは、自分たちの関心を深めようとしている矢先に、就職活動を始めるようにプレッシャーをかけられる。この状況は、当分変わりそうにない。

 世代間のギャップはあるものの、私は学生に関しては肯定的に考えることが好きだ。学生たち、早稲田大学、そして日本というこの偉大な国にはたくさんの希望がある。落ち込んだとき、私はバンジョーを弾く。すべてのことがシンプルになり、明日からまたがんばろうという気持ちが湧いてくる。