早稲田大学の教育・研究・文化を発信 WASEDA ONLINE

RSS

読売新聞オンライン

ホーム > キャンパスナウ > 新緑号 A WASEDA Miscellany

キャンパスナウ

▼新緑号

A WASEDA Miscellany

Glenn Stockwell

This theme:The many faces of internationalisation...

Glenn Stockwell
Professor, Faculty of Law

We often talk about the fact that the world is becoming more internationalised. Internationalisation, however, can take on a range of different shapes and forms, so to give a simple description of how the world has become more internationalised is not an easy thing to do. The School of Law where I work, for example, has shown a tendency to take on an increasing number of international students over the past few years, and the Graduate School of Law has outlined a policy to become a "Global-Hub Graduate School," outlining clear goals which include not only taking on more foreign students, but also engaging in active exchange with foreign universities, and providing global education for Japanese graduate students.

Internationalisation in my own case has also taken on a rather unusual form. I have been practicing the art of Iaido now for over 20 years, and it has now become a very large part of my life. Despite having a history of nearly 500 years, Iaido is a relatively unknown art even within Japan. Put simply, it is the art of swiftly drawing the katana (the Japanese sword) while performing a cut with the same movement. After dealing with the opponent, the katana is then smoothly returned to the scabbard, all while maintaining poise and presence.

I had trained under two different Iaido teachers in Australia before I met Yasuyoshi Kimura (10th Dan Hanshi) in Osaka in 1991, but fell in love with his style immediately. I trained nearly every day with Mr. Kimura, and I used to love going to see him and train with him. I eventually had to return to Australia in 1993 for career reasons, and the day that I told Mr. Kimura, he cried and made me promise that I would open a dojo (club) in Australia. I told him that I knew that I was not enough, but promised I would make a dojo he could be proud of.

I found there were great difficulties in being an Australian opening a dojo in Australia at fi rst, and there were people who felt that only Japanese people could teach the art correctly. I persevered and continued to train hard, returning to Japan when I could to keep improving my own skills, and the dojo membership grew, including some Japanese living in Australia. After two trips to Australia over the next four years, Mr. Kimura was satisfied with how things were progressing, and I was then hit with the biggest hurdle of my Iaido career - Mr. Kimura passed away from cancer in 1999. As often happens when a great teacher dies, the immediate students under Mr. Kimura fought for power, with most eventually drifting off in different directions. We continued to train by ourselves in Australia, but our existence was fragile in terms of a parent organisation.

In order to solidify our position, it was suggested that I take a few of the students from my dojo in Australia and compete in the National Iaido Championships in Kyoto to show that we were training correctly. I did, and the result was that my students won gold and silver medals in each event they participated in. We continued this trend for several years, each year bringing larger numbers of students, and each year being very successful in our results.

The outcome of our efforts was a strong bonding between my students in Australia, and the teachers and students in Japan. Iaido practitioners from Japan occasionally visit my dojo in Australia, and it is possible to see a closeness between everyone which goes beyond nationality and language barriers.Now ranked 7th Dan myself, I established a dojo here in Tokyo in 2006, and I now have students from Japan and all over the world. As a non-Japanese teacher of Iaido in Japan, I expected to fi nd resistance or suspicion from people, but have been pleasantly surprised to see that most people accept my Iaido for what it is.

Most importantly, it always moves me to see people from different languages, cultures and backgrounds, all joined together through the art of the sword, and I feel that this is perhaps one example of what internationalisation may be.

今回のテーマ:さまざまな形の国際化

グレン・ストックウェル/早稲田大学法学学術院教授

 今日、世界はますます国際化しているとよく言われますが、国際化には様々な形態や形式があり、どのように世界が国際化してきたかを一言で説明するのは容易なことではありません。例えば、私の所属する法学部では、ここ数年来、より多くの留学生を受け入れる傾向にあります。法学研究科では、「グローバル・ハブ大学院」を目指す方針を掲げており、より多くの留学生受け入れだけではなく、海外の大学との活発な学術交流や、日本の大学院生へのグローバルな教育の提供といった明確な目標が示されています。

 私自身が経験した国際化も、かなり変わったタイプのものです。私は20年以上にわたって居合道の修行を積み、今では私の生活のかなりの部分を占めるようになりました。居合道は約500年もの歴史がありながら、日本でさえあまり知られていません。簡単に説明すると、刀(日本刀)を素早く抜く技で、その動きの中で斬る動作も同時に行います。敵をさばいた後、刀は再びすみやかに鞘に戻されますが、その間常に型と作法を保つのです。

 1991年に、大阪で木村泰嘉先生(範士十段)に出会うまで、私はオーストラリアで二人の別々の先生について居合道の修行をしていました。しかし、木村先生の居合道にたちまち魅せられてしまいました。ほぼ毎日、木村先生と稽古し、先生に会いに行き一緒に修業をするのが楽しみでした。けれども、1993年に私は仕事の都合でオーストラリアに帰らなくてはならなくなりました。その事を木村先生に話した日、先生は涙を流し、オーストラリアで道場(クラブ)を開くことを、私に約束させたのです。自分には技能がまだ足りないと申し上げたものの、先生が誇れるような道場を開くことを約束しました。

 オーストラリア人の私が、オーストラリアで道場を開くにあたり、当初、様々な難問に直面しました。日本人でなければ技を正しく伝承できないと考えた人々もいました。しかし、私は努力を怠らず、厳しい修行を続け、自分自身の技を磨くため、可能な時には日本に戻ったりもしました。やがて、道場の門下生は増え、オーストラリアに住む日本人も入門するようになったのです。木村先生は、その間の4年間に2回オーストラリアを訪れてくださり、道場の発展の様子に満足なさっていました。けれども、私の居合道人生で最大の試練が待ちうけていました。1999年、木村先生は癌で亡くなられたのです。偉大な指導者が亡くなるとよくあるように、木村先生の直近の弟子達は指導者の座をめぐり対立し、結局ばらばらになってしまいました。私達はオーストラリアにて自分達で修行を続けていましたが、本部の状態を鑑みると、私達の存続は危ういものでした。

 そんな折、私達の立場を確固としたものにするために、オーストラリアの道場から数人の生徒を連れて、京都で開催される大日本居合道連盟全国大会に出場し、修行を正しく積んでいることを証明したらどうかという提案がなされました。私はその提案に従いました。その結果、私の門下生は、出場した各部門でそれぞれ優勝と準優勝に輝きました。それから数年間、毎年この大会に参加し、その度に出場する門下生の数も増やし、素晴らしい成績を残しました。

 私達の努力がもたらしたものは、オーストラリアの生徒と、日本の指導者や生徒との間に深まった絆です。日本で居合道に励む人々が、時折、オーストラリアにある私の道場を訪ねてくれ、国籍や言葉の壁を超えた人々の交流を目にすることができます。現在七段となった私は、2006年に東京に道場を開き、日本国内および世界中からの門下生を指導しています。日本で、日本人でもないのに居合道の指導をすれば、反感や疑念を抱かれるのではないかと思っていましたが、ほとんどの人々が私の居合道をそのまま受け入れてくれます。これは嬉しい驚きです。

 一番大切なことは、異なる言語や文化、背景を持つ人々が、刀の技を通して一つになることです。私はその光景にいつも感動します。これこそ、国際化とは何かを示す一例なのではないかと感じています。